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Boe Hog Blues Part 1
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Boe Hog Blues Part 1 featuring Spark Plug Smith III featuring Lottie Mo' The on backing vocals
Single - $2.00
Country - Alternative Country
Charts #35 in subgenre today (peak #7)
Previous peak charts position #40
Traditional
June 11, 2020
MP3 5.3 MB
320 kbps bitrate
WAV 17.1 MB
4:40 minutes
Story behind the song
Texas Alexander recorded "Boe Hog Blues" with Lonnie Johnson backing him, in San Antonio on March 10, 1928, the day after they recorded "Deep Blue Sea Blues". The sessions those two days were remarkably productive; March the ninth resulted in 9 issued songs, and March tenth yielded an additional three cuts. By this time, Lonnie Johnson sounds comfortable accompanying Texas Alexander, at least as comfortable as you could ever be. Lonnie is getting into some harmonic innovation here, too. On several songs from these sessions, he is going to the IV chord in the second bar of the 12-bar form, a move I always thought showed up much later in the evolution of the blues. Moreover, in a couple of instances, he goes to IVminor add9 in the second half of the second and sixth bars, the fingering of which, in his preferred DGDGBE tuning turns out so: X-0-0-3-3-5 It's really a pretty sound, and gives things a nice color there. Texas Alexander had a vocal mannerism of repeating the tag line of a verse occasionally, usually waiting until four bars after the completion of the verse to start the repetition, coinciding with the arrival of the IV chord in the next pass through the form. He does that here coming out of what looked like it was to be a hummed verse. The dilemma for Lonnie Johnason as an accompanist is whether he should finish out the form he has started, playing the final four bars of the pass, or bet on Texas Alexander starting his next verse at the conclusion of the four bars containing the repetition. On "Boe Hog Blues", Lonnie made the second choice, and it turns out perfectly. On some of the other songs, he opts to complete the form and ends up having Texas Alexander start a new verse over the V chord, in the ninth bar of the pass through the form containing the repetition. It appears that by this point Lonnie had figured out that you needed to be ready to bail out on the form, if the accompaniment was to match the singer's phrasing. Texas Alexander's performance is terrific. His lyrics are superlative, and cover so much ground that there's almost no way to tie them all together. To my taste, at least, the frankness of his sexual lyrics is welcome, especially when compared to standard "party" material, which at my time of life is starting to seem like kid's stuff. As for his last verse, wow. Oh, tell me, mama, how you want your rollin' done. (2) Set your face to the ground and your noodle up to the sun She got little bitty legs, gee, but them noble thighs (2) She's got somethin' under yonder, works like a boe hog's eye Wanta be your doctor, and I'll pay your doctor bill I'll be your doctor, pay your doctor bill Says, if the doctor don't cure you, I've got somethin' will Mmmm, Mmmm, Lawdy, Lawdy, Lawd I say if the doctor don't cure you, I've got somethin' will Says, I looked up at the Good Lord in the sky Says, I looked up at the Good Lord's in the sky Says, I heard a keen voice, says, "Papa, please don't die." SOLO: SPOKEN: Ah, tell it to me!
Lyrics
Texas Alexander recorded "Boe Hog Blues" with Lonnie Johnson backing him, in San Antonio on March 10, 1928, the day after they recorded "Deep Blue Sea Blues". The sessions those two days were remarkably productive; March the ninth resulted in 9 issued songs, and March tenth yielded an additional three cuts. By this time, Lonnie Johnson sounds comfortable accompanying Texas Alexander, at least as comfortable as you could ever be. Lonnie is getting into some harmonic innovation here, too. On several songs from these sessions, he is going to the IV chord in the second bar of the 12-bar form, a move I always thought showed up much later in the evolution of the blues. Moreover, in a couple of instances, he goes to IVminor add9 in the second half of the second and sixth bars, the fingering of which, in his preferred DGDGBE tuning turns out so: X-0-0-3-3-5 It's really a pretty sound, and gives things a nice color there. Texas Alexander had a vocal mannerism of repeating the tag line of a verse occasionally, usually waiting until four bars after the completion of the verse to start the repetition, coinciding with the arrival of the IV chord in the next pass through the form. He does that here coming out of what looked like it was to be a hummed verse. The dilemma for Lonnie Johnason as an accompanist is whether he should finish out the form he has started, playing the final four bars of the pass, or bet on Texas Alexander starting his next verse at the conclusion of the four bars containing the repetition. On "Boe Hog Blues", Lonnie made the second choice, and it turns out perfectly. On some of the other songs, he opts to complete the form and ends up having Texas Alexander start a new verse over the V chord, in the ninth bar of the pass through the form containing the repetition. It appears that by this point Lonnie had figured out that you needed to be ready to bail out on the form, if the accompaniment was to match the singer's phrasing. Texas Alexander's performance is terrific. His lyrics are superlative, and cover so much ground that there's almost no way to tie them all together. To my taste, at least, the frankness of his sexual lyrics is welcome, especially when compared to standard "party" material, which at my time of life is starting to seem like kid's stuff. As for his last verse, wow. Oh, tell me, mama, how you want your rollin' done. (2) Set your face to the ground and your noodle up to the sun She got little bitty legs, gee, but them noble thighs (2) She's got somethin' under yonder, works like a boe hog's eye Wanta be your doctor, and I'll pay your doctor bill I'll be your doctor, pay your doctor bill Says, if the doctor don't cure you, I've got somethin' will Mmmm, Mmmm, Lawdy, Lawdy, Lawd I say if the doctor don't cure you, I've got somethin' will Says, I looked up at the Good Lord in the sky Says, I looked up at the Good Lord's in the sky Says, I heard a keen voice, says, "Papa, please don't die." SOLO: SPOKEN: Ah, tell it to me!
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